New connections to conserve Australia’s Deserts

[March 2015]

The Ten Deserts Initiative launched its new website this month to promote its transboundary collaborations to protect the natural and cultural values of Australia’s diverse desert ecosystems.

Rangelands NRM Deserts and Pilbara Program Manager, Chris Curnow said that as a member of the Ten Deserts Initiative, Rangelands NRM is providing seed funding to develop its Terms of Reference and governance arrangements as well as to identify priority projects and establish initiatives.

“We will work with the Ten Deserts initiative and other partners to promote greater investment in looking after these special places,” he said.

Ten Deserts will hold its first face-to-face workshop on Tuesday 14 April 2015 in Alice Springs to set the scene and plan for upcoming collaboration. This event is being held in parallel to the Australian Rangelands Society’s 18th biennial conference, also taking place in Alice Springs at the same time.

The Initiative will develop opportunities for social and economic development through sustainable and integrated land management approaches in Australia’s desert country, spanning the ten deserts.

It will focus on raising awareness of Australia’s desert country, connecting disparate and remote partners for knowledge sharing and better use of land management resources, as well as landscape-scale management of critical ecological threats. 

The 10 deserts are: 

- Sturt Stony Desert (SA, QLD, NSW)
- Strzelecki Desert (SA, QLD, NSW)|
- Perdirka Desert (SA)
- Tirari Desert (SA)
- Great Sandy Desert (SA, WA)
- Simpson Desert (SA, QLD, NT)
- Gibson Desert (WA)\
- Little Sandy Desert (WA)
- Tanami Desert (NT, WA)
- Great Victoria Desert (SA, WA)
- and the arid and semi-arid lands of NT, WA, SA, QLD.

For more information, visit the Ten Deserts website 
or email the Coordinator, Jimmy Cocking.

Image1: Sunrise on the Pollock Hills, Ecotone between Great Sandy and Gibson deserts, Kiwirrkurra Indigenous Protected Area, photo by Rangelands NRM, Chris Curnow.
Image2: Google map with depiction of ten desert boundaries, courtesy of Ten Deserts Initiative.